hipsterlibertarian:

NYPD officer pictured ‘putting seven-months pregnant woman into a chokehold for illegally grilling outside her apartment’

An advocacy group has released images which claim to show an NYPD officer putting a seven-months pregnant woman into a chokehold for illegally grilling on the sidewalk in front of her apartment. 
NYPD officers have been banned from using the chokehold since 1993, but an officer can be seen in the pictures wrapping his arm around 27-year-old Rosan Miller’s neck in the Saturday incident. 
Her young daughter is also in the pictures, watching the arrest unfold.

Illegally grilling on the sidewalk! What a hardened, dangerous criminal! And I bet that little girl now has a very solid grasp on who she can trust and what’s ok to do to women and/or people who are physically weaker than you!

hipsterlibertarian:

NYPD officer pictured ‘putting seven-months pregnant woman into a chokehold for illegally grilling outside her apartment’

An advocacy group has released images which claim to show an NYPD officer putting a seven-months pregnant woman into a chokehold for illegally grilling on the sidewalk in front of her apartment. 

NYPD officers have been banned from using the chokehold since 1993, but an officer can be seen in the pictures wrapping his arm around 27-year-old Rosan Miller’s neck in the Saturday incident. 

Her young daughter is also in the pictures, watching the arrest unfold.

Illegally grilling on the sidewalk! What a hardened, dangerous criminal! And I bet that little girl now has a very solid grasp on who she can trust and what’s ok to do to women and/or people who are physically weaker than you!

artchipel:

David Jien (USA)
David Jien’s art takes visitors into a world filled with adventure, danger and sex. Old-fashioned romance simmers beneath the surfaces of the 30-year-old’s super-cool drawings, suffusing their action-packed dramas with unexpected tenderness. Artist’s works on paper tell his life story — not literally, like so much of the self-infatuated navel-gazing that digital technology makes possible, but with a more generous, user-friendly mix of poetic license, youthful excess, dreamy passion and labor-intensive devotion. Jien treats the facts of his biography — first-generation Taiwanese American, veteran tagger who spent time in jail and recent art school graduate — as raw material for the fantastic stories that unfold in his pictures. Inspired by such disparate sources as Nintendo, Persian miniatures, Chinese scrolls, Homer, Chaucer, Stanley Kubrick, Roald Dahl, Henry Darger and Trenton Doyle Hancock, Jien’s art brings far-flung elements into a form-savvy epic that is familiar and formidable and a thrill to get lost in. (see more: David Pagel reviews David Jien’s “The Plight of the Who” at Richard Heller Gallery)
© All images courtesy of the artist
[more David Jien | artist found at juxtapoz]
Zoom Info
artchipel:

David Jien (USA)
David Jien’s art takes visitors into a world filled with adventure, danger and sex. Old-fashioned romance simmers beneath the surfaces of the 30-year-old’s super-cool drawings, suffusing their action-packed dramas with unexpected tenderness. Artist’s works on paper tell his life story — not literally, like so much of the self-infatuated navel-gazing that digital technology makes possible, but with a more generous, user-friendly mix of poetic license, youthful excess, dreamy passion and labor-intensive devotion. Jien treats the facts of his biography — first-generation Taiwanese American, veteran tagger who spent time in jail and recent art school graduate — as raw material for the fantastic stories that unfold in his pictures. Inspired by such disparate sources as Nintendo, Persian miniatures, Chinese scrolls, Homer, Chaucer, Stanley Kubrick, Roald Dahl, Henry Darger and Trenton Doyle Hancock, Jien’s art brings far-flung elements into a form-savvy epic that is familiar and formidable and a thrill to get lost in. (see more: David Pagel reviews David Jien’s “The Plight of the Who” at Richard Heller Gallery)
© All images courtesy of the artist
[more David Jien | artist found at juxtapoz]
Zoom Info
artchipel:

David Jien (USA)
David Jien’s art takes visitors into a world filled with adventure, danger and sex. Old-fashioned romance simmers beneath the surfaces of the 30-year-old’s super-cool drawings, suffusing their action-packed dramas with unexpected tenderness. Artist’s works on paper tell his life story — not literally, like so much of the self-infatuated navel-gazing that digital technology makes possible, but with a more generous, user-friendly mix of poetic license, youthful excess, dreamy passion and labor-intensive devotion. Jien treats the facts of his biography — first-generation Taiwanese American, veteran tagger who spent time in jail and recent art school graduate — as raw material for the fantastic stories that unfold in his pictures. Inspired by such disparate sources as Nintendo, Persian miniatures, Chinese scrolls, Homer, Chaucer, Stanley Kubrick, Roald Dahl, Henry Darger and Trenton Doyle Hancock, Jien’s art brings far-flung elements into a form-savvy epic that is familiar and formidable and a thrill to get lost in. (see more: David Pagel reviews David Jien’s “The Plight of the Who” at Richard Heller Gallery)
© All images courtesy of the artist
[more David Jien | artist found at juxtapoz]
Zoom Info
artchipel:

David Jien (USA)
David Jien’s art takes visitors into a world filled with adventure, danger and sex. Old-fashioned romance simmers beneath the surfaces of the 30-year-old’s super-cool drawings, suffusing their action-packed dramas with unexpected tenderness. Artist’s works on paper tell his life story — not literally, like so much of the self-infatuated navel-gazing that digital technology makes possible, but with a more generous, user-friendly mix of poetic license, youthful excess, dreamy passion and labor-intensive devotion. Jien treats the facts of his biography — first-generation Taiwanese American, veteran tagger who spent time in jail and recent art school graduate — as raw material for the fantastic stories that unfold in his pictures. Inspired by such disparate sources as Nintendo, Persian miniatures, Chinese scrolls, Homer, Chaucer, Stanley Kubrick, Roald Dahl, Henry Darger and Trenton Doyle Hancock, Jien’s art brings far-flung elements into a form-savvy epic that is familiar and formidable and a thrill to get lost in. (see more: David Pagel reviews David Jien’s “The Plight of the Who” at Richard Heller Gallery)
© All images courtesy of the artist
[more David Jien | artist found at juxtapoz]
Zoom Info
artchipel:

David Jien (USA)
David Jien’s art takes visitors into a world filled with adventure, danger and sex. Old-fashioned romance simmers beneath the surfaces of the 30-year-old’s super-cool drawings, suffusing their action-packed dramas with unexpected tenderness. Artist’s works on paper tell his life story — not literally, like so much of the self-infatuated navel-gazing that digital technology makes possible, but with a more generous, user-friendly mix of poetic license, youthful excess, dreamy passion and labor-intensive devotion. Jien treats the facts of his biography — first-generation Taiwanese American, veteran tagger who spent time in jail and recent art school graduate — as raw material for the fantastic stories that unfold in his pictures. Inspired by such disparate sources as Nintendo, Persian miniatures, Chinese scrolls, Homer, Chaucer, Stanley Kubrick, Roald Dahl, Henry Darger and Trenton Doyle Hancock, Jien’s art brings far-flung elements into a form-savvy epic that is familiar and formidable and a thrill to get lost in. (see more: David Pagel reviews David Jien’s “The Plight of the Who” at Richard Heller Gallery)
© All images courtesy of the artist
[more David Jien | artist found at juxtapoz]
Zoom Info

artchipel:

David Jien (USA)

David Jien’s art takes visitors into a world filled with adventure, danger and sex. Old-fashioned romance simmers beneath the surfaces of the 30-year-old’s super-cool drawings, suffusing their action-packed dramas with unexpected tenderness. Artist’s works on paper tell his life story — not literally, like so much of the self-infatuated navel-gazing that digital technology makes possible, but with a more generous, user-friendly mix of poetic license, youthful excess, dreamy passion and labor-intensive devotion. Jien treats the facts of his biography — first-generation Taiwanese American, veteran tagger who spent time in jail and recent art school graduate — as raw material for the fantastic stories that unfold in his pictures. Inspired by such disparate sources as Nintendo, Persian miniatures, Chinese scrolls, Homer, Chaucer, Stanley Kubrick, Roald Dahl, Henry Darger and Trenton Doyle Hancock, Jien’s art brings far-flung elements into a form-savvy epic that is familiar and formidable and a thrill to get lost in. (see more: David Pagel reviews David Jien’s “The Plight of the Who” at Richard Heller Gallery)

© All images courtesy of the artist

[more David Jien | artist found at juxtapoz]

kadecorreia:

social-darwin-awards:

ocebutt:

social-darwin-awards:

dontjudgemeimscared:

social-darwin-awards:

priceofliberty:

fastcompany:

It almost looks like a nuclear war played out on the Internet.
Read More>

Click the read more, there’s a lot this GIF doesn’t show you. After you watch a playthru of the conversation over the U.S., watch it again and this time focus on the rest of the world. You’ll notice the UK remains cognizant throughout, but as the week goes on, more and more people all over the world begin to pay attention. It’s no wonder the protests have received the attention of Amnesty International.

DEFCON ONE.
It seems like Russia gives very few fucks.

And alaska doesnt care.

There’s no one in Alaska.

Large parts of central Canada seem to be pretty barren? Which is very odd.

Not particularly, the vast majority of Canada’s population is centered above the northeastern United States.

I’d thought originally that people would get tired of the conversation as time went on - and maybe we just haven’t hit that point yet - but I feel very encouraged by how engaged the world still is about bringing justice to our system.

kadecorreia:

social-darwin-awards:

ocebutt:

social-darwin-awards:

dontjudgemeimscared:

social-darwin-awards:

priceofliberty:

fastcompany:

It almost looks like a nuclear war played out on the Internet.

Read More>

Click the read more, there’s a lot this GIF doesn’t show you. After you watch a playthru of the conversation over the U.S., watch it again and this time focus on the rest of the world. You’ll notice the UK remains cognizant throughout, but as the week goes on, more and more people all over the world begin to pay attention. It’s no wonder the protests have received the attention of Amnesty International.

DEFCON ONE.

It seems like Russia gives very few fucks.

And alaska doesnt care.

There’s no one in Alaska.

Large parts of central Canada seem to be pretty barren? Which is very odd.

Not particularly, the vast majority of Canada’s population is centered above the northeastern United States.

I’d thought originally that people would get tired of the conversation as time went on - and maybe we just haven’t hit that point yet - but I feel very encouraged by how engaged the world still is about bringing justice to our system.